love~dream~hope~dance
I'm Emily I am 18 years old from Ontario, Canada ! Welcome to my blog, if you ever have any questions, feel free to ask them!
love~dream~hope~dance
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#mcm always🙊  Jonas Brothers 😍#jonasbrothers #jb @nickjonas @kevinjonas @joejonas
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Lovin this lipstick color! 😘💋#kiss #kiss #barbiepink #lipstick #makeup #love
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Check out my new #tumblr ! dreamlivelovehope95.tumblr.com
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#love #hope #dream #peace
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got my nails done again #pink #nails #sparkle #shellac #accent #silver
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Happy Birthday to my Biggest Brother Nick ! Who I know always has my back and is there for me ! Have a great and fun birthday big bro! Love you! 💙 @originalchiapet
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Staying strong each day and taking it one step at a time. That’s all I can do for now #life
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Everyone should keep this in mind if they are in a relationship .
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instagram:

Creating “Nezo Art” (#寝相アート) with @erichedelic

To see more photos of “nezo art,” browse the #寝相アート hashtag and follow @erichedelic on Instagram.

"The way my baby daughter slept was so funny, and I had some time to spare while she was asleep," explains Fukuoka Instagrammer Eriko Ohga (@erichedelic). In Japan, a growing trend called “nezo art” (寝相アート) has been inspiring mothers like Eriko to take creative photos of their babies while they sleep. Literally meaning “sleep-posture art” in Japanese, this new style of documenting baby years allows moms to have some fun during their few hours of peace while the little one sleeps.

The “nezo art” that creative moms like Eriko share are especially elaborate, using costumes and household props like laundry to shape scenes that tell stories. “I try to form a rough idea of the scene I want to create and prepare the area where my daughter would lay down before she falls asleep,” reveals Eriko. She then places her daughter in the designated setup, and, once the baby is asleep, the rest of the parts are put together in stealthy movements. Eriko also shares her tips for shooting the finished image: “I climb up on a chair to capture the entire scene from above. I’m also extra careful not to wake the baby up with the sound of the iPhone camera.”
instagram:

Creating “Nezo Art” (#寝相アート) with @erichedelic

To see more photos of “nezo art,” browse the #寝相アート hashtag and follow @erichedelic on Instagram.

"The way my baby daughter slept was so funny, and I had some time to spare while she was asleep," explains Fukuoka Instagrammer Eriko Ohga (@erichedelic). In Japan, a growing trend called “nezo art” (寝相アート) has been inspiring mothers like Eriko to take creative photos of their babies while they sleep. Literally meaning “sleep-posture art” in Japanese, this new style of documenting baby years allows moms to have some fun during their few hours of peace while the little one sleeps.

The “nezo art” that creative moms like Eriko share are especially elaborate, using costumes and household props like laundry to shape scenes that tell stories. “I try to form a rough idea of the scene I want to create and prepare the area where my daughter would lay down before she falls asleep,” reveals Eriko. She then places her daughter in the designated setup, and, once the baby is asleep, the rest of the parts are put together in stealthy movements. Eriko also shares her tips for shooting the finished image: “I climb up on a chair to capture the entire scene from above. I’m also extra careful not to wake the baby up with the sound of the iPhone camera.”
instagram:

Creating “Nezo Art” (#寝相アート) with @erichedelic

To see more photos of “nezo art,” browse the #寝相アート hashtag and follow @erichedelic on Instagram.

"The way my baby daughter slept was so funny, and I had some time to spare while she was asleep," explains Fukuoka Instagrammer Eriko Ohga (@erichedelic). In Japan, a growing trend called “nezo art” (寝相アート) has been inspiring mothers like Eriko to take creative photos of their babies while they sleep. Literally meaning “sleep-posture art” in Japanese, this new style of documenting baby years allows moms to have some fun during their few hours of peace while the little one sleeps.

The “nezo art” that creative moms like Eriko share are especially elaborate, using costumes and household props like laundry to shape scenes that tell stories. “I try to form a rough idea of the scene I want to create and prepare the area where my daughter would lay down before she falls asleep,” reveals Eriko. She then places her daughter in the designated setup, and, once the baby is asleep, the rest of the parts are put together in stealthy movements. Eriko also shares her tips for shooting the finished image: “I climb up on a chair to capture the entire scene from above. I’m also extra careful not to wake the baby up with the sound of the iPhone camera.”
instagram:

Creating “Nezo Art” (#寝相アート) with @erichedelic

To see more photos of “nezo art,” browse the #寝相アート hashtag and follow @erichedelic on Instagram.

"The way my baby daughter slept was so funny, and I had some time to spare while she was asleep," explains Fukuoka Instagrammer Eriko Ohga (@erichedelic). In Japan, a growing trend called “nezo art” (寝相アート) has been inspiring mothers like Eriko to take creative photos of their babies while they sleep. Literally meaning “sleep-posture art” in Japanese, this new style of documenting baby years allows moms to have some fun during their few hours of peace while the little one sleeps.

The “nezo art” that creative moms like Eriko share are especially elaborate, using costumes and household props like laundry to shape scenes that tell stories. “I try to form a rough idea of the scene I want to create and prepare the area where my daughter would lay down before she falls asleep,” reveals Eriko. She then places her daughter in the designated setup, and, once the baby is asleep, the rest of the parts are put together in stealthy movements. Eriko also shares her tips for shooting the finished image: “I climb up on a chair to capture the entire scene from above. I’m also extra careful not to wake the baby up with the sound of the iPhone camera.”
instagram:

Creating “Nezo Art” (#寝相アート) with @erichedelic

To see more photos of “nezo art,” browse the #寝相アート hashtag and follow @erichedelic on Instagram.

"The way my baby daughter slept was so funny, and I had some time to spare while she was asleep," explains Fukuoka Instagrammer Eriko Ohga (@erichedelic). In Japan, a growing trend called “nezo art” (寝相アート) has been inspiring mothers like Eriko to take creative photos of their babies while they sleep. Literally meaning “sleep-posture art” in Japanese, this new style of documenting baby years allows moms to have some fun during their few hours of peace while the little one sleeps.

The “nezo art” that creative moms like Eriko share are especially elaborate, using costumes and household props like laundry to shape scenes that tell stories. “I try to form a rough idea of the scene I want to create and prepare the area where my daughter would lay down before she falls asleep,” reveals Eriko. She then places her daughter in the designated setup, and, once the baby is asleep, the rest of the parts are put together in stealthy movements. Eriko also shares her tips for shooting the finished image: “I climb up on a chair to capture the entire scene from above. I’m also extra careful not to wake the baby up with the sound of the iPhone camera.”
instagram:

Creating “Nezo Art” (#寝相アート) with @erichedelic

To see more photos of “nezo art,” browse the #寝相アート hashtag and follow @erichedelic on Instagram.

"The way my baby daughter slept was so funny, and I had some time to spare while she was asleep," explains Fukuoka Instagrammer Eriko Ohga (@erichedelic). In Japan, a growing trend called “nezo art” (寝相アート) has been inspiring mothers like Eriko to take creative photos of their babies while they sleep. Literally meaning “sleep-posture art” in Japanese, this new style of documenting baby years allows moms to have some fun during their few hours of peace while the little one sleeps.

The “nezo art” that creative moms like Eriko share are especially elaborate, using costumes and household props like laundry to shape scenes that tell stories. “I try to form a rough idea of the scene I want to create and prepare the area where my daughter would lay down before she falls asleep,” reveals Eriko. She then places her daughter in the designated setup, and, once the baby is asleep, the rest of the parts are put together in stealthy movements. Eriko also shares her tips for shooting the finished image: “I climb up on a chair to capture the entire scene from above. I’m also extra careful not to wake the baby up with the sound of the iPhone camera.”